“outside the play, there is a reality firmly in its place, a reality to which we can return ..As long as the big Other knows that this is only a play and not reality, I can enjoy its dimension of the real.” – For the play can indeed affect me, and it can affect me beyond the place and time of the performance. The “effects of the real” produced by the play do not necessarily go away when the curtain falls and I return to my usual reality. They can become a part of this reality, without becoming one with it. Let’s now go back to the “sneezing corpse” example. In a theatre performance, a sneezing corpse will not strike us as uncanny – it will strike us as funny, possibly comical, and we’ll come back to that distinction in a moment. What could strike us as uncanny, for example, is if at the end of the play, the actor playing the corpse did not stand up to receive the applause with the other actors, but were to remain lying dead on the floor. This would imply precisely that the Other (supposed to know how things stand in reality and to guarantee that they remain standing as they do) no longer holds this knowledge and this guaranty for the subject. In other words, it would imply that our own better knowledge (of the fact that this is “only a play” we are watching) is left without the support in the Other. If we think about it for a moment, this is a very typical configuration of the uncanny: the nightmarish feeling when the subject is alone in seeing that there is something wrong with what is happening, with no Other to support her knowledge or experience, and to make it transmittable to others. 6 In the uncanny, the emergence of the impossiblereal object in the field of the Other always involves this radical severance of the subject from the Other. Zupancic-Reversals-of-Nothing-The-Case-of-the-Sneezing-Corpse http://ift.tt/1PvJRNc

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