“Our own experience inclines us to think that nothing in the world is further removed from..the sorrow over the death of a friend..than its description.” – One suffers oneself to be drawn away – this is easily done, if one doesn’t resist – by the concentrated otherness of the person writing, and lets oneself be made into his counterpart. Thus it is no longer remarkable, when one is brought back to one’s self by the closing of the book, that one feels the better for this excursion and this recreation, and, with a clearer head, remains behind in one’s own being, which has been newly discovered, newly shaken up and seen for a moment from the distance. Only later are we surprised that these experiences of another person’s life, in spite of their vividness, are faithfully described in the book. FRANZ KAFKA http://ift.tt/1NIeKcy

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