Betty (i.e., Diane) can no longer disavow the illusory nature of the experience. ..Betty looks down in her purse and sees a blue box

..Rita turns around and Betty should once again be in the shot, she is not there. As Betty and Rita reach the point at which the fantasy world intersects with the world of desire, Diane’s representative in her fantasy can no longer continue to exist.

– TODD MCGOWAN ON MULHOLLAND DRIVE

After Rita uses the key to open the blue box, the camera moves into the opening in the top of the box and is subsumed by the darkness inside. The film impels us to experience briefly the void that exists between fantasy and desire,

but we are quickly thrust into the world of desire, in which the woman who owns the apartment- Betty’s aunt in the fantasy-walks in; there is no trace of either Rita or Betty.

only by insisting on fantasy to the end can one arrive at the experience of silence.

– TODD MCGOWAN on Mulholland Drive

“[The way in which the film depicts her] progressive suffering [puts] us in the position of the sadistic observer secretly enjoying what he officially condemns” – [Lars von Trier’s film Dancer in the Dark professes] compassion with the excessively good heroine. [But the way in which the film depicts her] progressive suffering [puts] us in the position of the sadistic observer secretly enjoying what he officially condms: this sadistic pleasure is ..the hidden truth of compassion. And for this, von Trier should never be forgiven.
– Lenin’s Choice – SLAVOJ ZIZEK

“Joe’s analysis comes to an end when she is able to witness how ..senseless her compulsion is.”

http://ift.tt/1DRTQ8k On NYMPHOMANIC II

“Then Seligmann tries to have sex with Joe! ..Everything crumbles. ..He heard nothing but her symptomatic demand to be used, and in so doing he symbolically annuls her true desire.”

http://ift.tt/1EhzhDw on NYMPHOMANIAC II

I disagree with the above slightly. Joe does not need to see her nymphomania in a new light, she needs to relate to someone in a new light. – ANDRE VANTINO